music on / off
In Remembrance of Mogwai Fox

26 October, 2006 ~ 26 January, 2016
Atlanta, GA, United States



In loving memory of Moggy Aka Mogwai. Only heaven could part us for I could never part with him on earth. We love him. Always.
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Hi, I have been reading your blog for a while and drnippog a line today for I finally found someone raising the very fundammental question and became too itchy to let go of it unnoticed. To answer the question, I just can't read when music is on: I used to be less flexible regarding this rule, and could not read almost anything. So you can imagine how inconvenient it could be because in a place like, say, Starbucks, it is almost impossible to ask for non-music' environment. So I guess I ended up up accomodating along with what the reality is around me. Now I'd say I can read more than I used to, especially those that take less attention or texts written in more mechanical fashions. For the same token, I hardly read on in an adequate pace when it comes to literature' and philosophy' genre, which are obviously incorporated in less predictable manners. But the worst of all that I discovered to read under musical environment' is music scores. I almost never get to read scores when any music is around. Doesn't that explain what goes on when a human brain tries to process the written info and re-create the sound of it usuing one's physical system? In that sense, reading is the same experience whether it is a a text and or a score. The other day, I heard that a majority of dyslexia is the case that occurs or persists when he/she does not know how words sound in the first place, so the person has the problem with how to recreate the sound in his perception. Therefore, they would not get to process the information. And music scores was the ultimate form of recording the accoustic infomation. It is probably the scetchiest, too, because the huge part of its function is dependent upon others' physical function of interpreting and recreating the sound.'It is all the more similar to mathmatics as people often say.Good luck with your new semester and lots of fun reading!
By Jay   Feb 27, 2016
Hi, I have been reading your blog for a while and drnippog a line today for I finally found someone raising the very fundammental question and became too itchy to let go of it unnoticed. To answer the question, I just can't read when music is on: I used to be less flexible regarding this rule, and could not read almost anything. So you can imagine how inconvenient it could be because in a place like, say, Starbucks, it is almost impossible to ask for non-music' environment. So I guess I ended up up accomodating along with what the reality is around me. Now I'd say I can read more than I used to, especially those that take less attention or texts written in more mechanical fashions. For the same token, I hardly read on in an adequate pace when it comes to literature' and philosophy' genre, which are obviously incorporated in less predictable manners. But the worst of all that I discovered to read under musical environment' is music scores. I almost never get to read scores when any music is around. Doesn't that explain what goes on when a human brain tries to process the written info and re-create the sound of it usuing one's physical system? In that sense, reading is the same experience whether it is a a text and or a score. The other day, I heard that a majority of dyslexia is the case that occurs or persists when he/she does not know how words sound in the first place, so the person has the problem with how to recreate the sound in his perception. Therefore, they would not get to process the information. And music scores was the ultimate form of recording the accoustic infomation. It is probably the scetchiest, too, because the huge part of its function is dependent upon others' physical function of interpreting and recreating the sound.'It is all the more similar to mathmatics as people often say.Good luck with your new semester and lots of fun reading!




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